Are Smartphones Becoming Stale? The Rise of Wearable Technology

Many folks will say that smartphones are in their prime however, 2007, when Apple first introduced the iPhone that changed the smartphone world, seems like ages ago. Certainly, the battle to be the best in the smartphone industry is still going strong, but with new technologies like wearable electronics, the smartphone might be on its last legs as the “thing to have.”

It seems as if the innovation in the smartphone industry has nearly disappeared and with companies like Samsung and Apple fighting for basics like screen size and resolution, there really isn’t much left that excites consumers. Enter the wearable gear.

Samsung’s Galaxy Gear uses their Galaxy line of smartphones to interact with the user on an entirely different level. Samsung claims that it’s easier than ever to answer a hands-free phone call, take a quick snapshot, or even find your favorite local coffee shop – all without ever reaching for your phone.

Google has their own piece of wearable gear with Google Glass. Google says Glass helps integrate its technology into everyday life, switching the user’s focus back up to eye level, by removing the need to constantly look down at a hand-held phone.

Google Glass

Apple has plans to introduce their own wearable technology sometime this summer and I’m sure many others will follow suit.

android refrigeratorAndroid is also working its way into household appliances like refrigerators, coffee makers, dishwashers, and the latest breakthrough of having “Android in your Audi,” showing us that there are many areas of our lives that have yet to be infiltrated with technology, but I can guarantee you all of the major players in the industry will be trying to change that soon enough. Android Refrigerator Screen

I certainly consider myself an early adopter of new technology, mostly due to all of the testing I perform in my every day job here at Algonquin Studios. However, I can’t see myself being an early adopter to these new wearable technologies. I’ve never owned a watch, simply because I’m not comfortable wearing one, so I don’t see myself wearing a “Smart Watch” anytime soon.

samsung smart watch

And, while I know my wife would tell you I have too many tablets and smartphones lying around at any given time, I think I’ll also be hard-pressed to purchase an Android-powered refrigerator due to price point. This doesn’t, however, stop me from spending hours every day researching what’s next in the industry.

All of these new technologies might seem pretty silly now, but how many of us thought that having a small super computer in our back pockets would ever be a great idea? What do you think will be the next viral technology? I would love to hear everyone’s feedback!

Safeguarding Your Data

Many of us deal with sensitive information on a daily basis. Whether that’s financial accounts, healthcare records, social security numbers, or trade secrets (to name a few), it’s imperative that we take precautions to safeguard this data as best we can. I’m going to share a few free or low-cost options that can better accomplish this.

1. Secure Your Smartphone

A lot of damage could be done if your phone falls into the wrong hands. I’d guess that a majority of us have our e-mail accounts configured on our phones in addition to a decent list of contacts. It would be easy enough for someone to impersonate you by sending a text message or e-mail, potentially gaining access to sensitive information. Minimally, you should make sure your phone is protected with a PIN or password. This should buy you enough time to change passwords and/or let people know that your phone has been lost. A better option would be to enable a Remote Wipe utility on your phone, that allows you to factory reset your phone and wipe away any important data. This article offers a good smartphone protection synopsis.

2. Encrypt Your Hard Drive 

If you use a laptop for work purposes, I strongly suggest that you encrypt your hard drive. It’s a lot simpler to accomplish than it sounds and it provides a great peace of mind for you, your company, and, potentially, your customers. Why take the chance that your sensitive data could be compromised so easily? The EFF outlines a few different encryption options.

 3. Don’t Overreact to E-mails

Phishers and scammers love to prey on your emotions. A popular ploy is to send an e-mail claiming that there has been a security breach and that you need to verify your current credentials and then change your current password. Often, this e-mail will include a link to a fake site that asks for authentication. If you’re not careful and react too quickly to a scam such as this, your entire network could be compromised. It’s best to take a second and ask around first and/or call your security personnel directly and verify the e-mail.

 4. Use a Password Manager

Ahh, password security. You know the drill. Create a secure password, usually with a mix of symbols, upper and lower case letters, and numbers. Oh, and don’t re-use passwords. Oh, and change your password for every account every X days. Make it easy on yourself, and ensure that you’re taking proper precautions to safeguard all of your accounts in the event that one of them gets compromised. An easy way to manage this is to install a password management utility. Most of them work the same way; create one ultra-secure passphrase that opens the utility, then copy and paste the specific password for the account you’re accessing. Once again, this sounds more complicated than it is in practice.

5. Enable 2-Factor Authentication for Gmail

If you have a Gmail account that you use for e-mail, consider enabling 2-factor authentication. It’s a free option that Google provides that allows you to add an additional layer of security to your account. In addition to username and password, you’ll be sent an additional token code (by voice or text message) that you’ll have to enter to verify your identity. If you’d prefer to not enter a token every time you authenticate, there’s an option to designate trusted computers instead. Google outlines their 2-factor authentication options on their support site.