Styling Tabular Data with CSS3

In my career as a web developer, I’ve helped build many web applications that require the display of tabular data in a clean and simple fashion. Over time, I’ve developed a few techniques for doing so that are effective and easy to implement.

But before I go into that, let me quickly remind my fellow web developers that tables are not, in fact, the enemy. Although the days of using tables for layout are long past, tables are still a perfectly appropriate method for displaying tabular data on the web.

However, I must also acknowledge that there are some disadvantages to working with tables to be aware of, including:

  1. Tables don’t always scale down well and may display poorly when space is limited, like on mobile devices. If your primary audience is viewing your web site on mobile devices, it may be better to use lists or other markup that’s better suited for vertical display.
  2. Tables are not as adaptable as other elements, especially in older versions of Internet Explorer, and that can limit your options when developing a responsive web site.
  3. Display tends to vary slightly across different browsers. This is particularly true with column widths. I’ve encountered many situations where the text in one column wraps to two lines while there is clearly ample space to accommodate for it in another cell. There are ways to get around that of course, but the solution is generally specific to the situation.

So after much preamble, here are four simple examples that I’ve created to demonstrate different ways you can work with tables to display data cleanly:

  1. Basic Grid with Alternating Row Colors
  2. Basic Grid with Alternating Row and Column Colors
  3. Basic Grid with Rounded Corners
  4. Simplified Grid with Generated Content