Things I Wish I’d Known Preparing for Ground Truth – Part 2

Ok, in Part 1 of this post, we covered a good chunk of the lessons my team learned during our trip to China with the Executive MBA program at the University at Buffalo.

But, there’s more to earning solid feedback on your product from prospective customers than just delivering a sound demo. If you think there’s a different culture on the west coast of the US relative to the east coast, try meeting your customers in China! Before we grew comfortable listening, watching, and adapting in our new environment, my team risked coming back with nothing or missing the point, several times.

Get local through your errors. Before we departed, every book and coach told us not to drink the tap water. There’s not enough time to adjust on a short trip. Yet, one morning I slurped some while brushing my teeth, and didn’t realize it for several hours. When you adjust, you’ll probably do it by letting go. Just embrace it.

The Bottled Water Acid Test. Yup, we drank a lot of bottled water, and everywhere we went our hosts offered it to us. They watched as we drank it. Over time I thought this must be a stereotype of westerners. Or did it reveal how much I trusted the host? We were sensitive too, after hearing about refilled and resealed bottles. Rituals come in all forms.

Start early and make it easy. We scored seven meetings for two days. To do this, we started reaching out two months earlier. We avoided loading our hosts with any onerous work, especially reading long text blocks or keeping track. We reminded them of our meetings before we left the US. A couple of days before each meeting, we confirmed. One firm still moved a meeting from 10:30am to 8:00am, giving us just enough time to drop breakfast and run.

Forge a connection. To get those meetings, we tried a few strategies. Personal connections worked best, where someone had a cousin in-country and made introductions for us. Shared history scored too: did one of us go to the same school as a prospect? We got a 15% response rate from a targeted email blast to association members. To increase that rate, we could have adapted the request to be more relevant to each recipient. After meeting, most hosts shared a list of people we should speak to next, both inside their firm and at others. How kind!

Who are you talking to? On some of our tours, our hosts clearly spoke to the perceived leader of our crew first, and then to everyone else. It was striking. We soon tried it, using the business cards we received as strong hints about seniority. Would we have given them a disrespectful impression otherwise?

Help me save face! Once, we met with an operator and a manager and asked them to fill out a five minute survey for us. The manager sighed, rubbed his eyes, and said that he couldn’t complete it because he’d forgotten his reading glasses. Being super helpful, we offered to walk him through it. Much later, we realized our big mistake: perhaps his English wasn’t as good as his protégé’s, and he’d offered us a card to help him save face? We’d taken the card and burned it. Ach!

How close is too close? In a giant unfamiliar city, how much time should you place between meetings? In Beijing and Shanghai, one hour worked just fine for taxi travel. They were clean and quick (and almost always Volkswagen Foxes), and we asked our hotel concierge to write out directions in Chinese and English to give to our taxi driver. We brought the hotel card to get home again. We tried hard to keep our meetings to one hour, too.

Localization Details Matter. Localization is more than just translation. Our prospects remarked that they would consider us if we certified compliance with China’s legal framework. English is acceptable, but adding an interface in the legal form of Chinese would be better since it’s more widely understood than a particular dialect. Showing culturally appropriate use cases in our demo would have helped too. For example, Chinese occupants keep their rooms in the mid 70’s F. Who knew that detail beforehand? Our hosts might have wondered, “Why do these people always want me to freeze?”

Challenge or Business Opportunity? The list goes on. For example, there is wide variation between coastal and inland China, and rural and urban China, even more than in the US. At the time, there were no carriers able to deliver packages everywhere in China, and few fulfillment houses distributing for US firms. Each carrier had regional or urban-only coverage. Experience with computers and English varied inland, too.

Needless to say, the next time we collect on-the-ground feedback in China, we’ll be much better prepared. If you’re planning a project like this, consider doing it in stages, with time re-factor your approach each round. Everyone we met with was so helpful that I’d expect improvement to come quickly for you.

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