Project Management & Relationships

Very often our blog contributors post great articles about things like managing expectations, solving problems for our clients, and gathering requirements from a client. All of the articles touch on topics that are very relevant to the work we do as consultants every day and one of the key aspects of doing each of these things well and, in turn, being good consultants, is to develop strong relationships with our clients.

Learn About the Key Players

When setting out on a project, one of my goals is to gather the requirements of the software that we’re being engaged to build. Beyond that, we need to understand who the decision makers are. These are often the people that we’ll being dealing with regularly to get things accomplished and make sure the project doesn’t stall due to indecision or missed deliverables. From the smallest task that requires a simple yes/no answer to a very important meeting to discuss a pivotal system process, as Development Managers, we’ll regularly engage the key decision makers to get all the necessary tasks completed.

As part of building a relationship with the parties involved in a project, we’re always trying to understand how our software will help their business. Clear communication is important to any project and we’ll often need to go the extra step of learning the company or industry-specific terminology that our clients use on a day-to-day basis. This helps us understand requests and communicate with each client most effectively.

Another important thing to learn about key parties for a project: what forces are driving their requests, decisions, and actions? From the start, we need to try to find what will make the project run smoothly and what could potentially hold the project back. Key questions here will cover topics like target dates, project budgets, and critical processes. These questions and their answers will help us do exactly what many of our other blog posts talk about–gather requirements, manage expectations, solve problems–all of which are crucial to the success of a project.

Row With, Not Against, the Third-Party Stream

What if your project requires you to work with someone in addition to your client? As a software development team, we regularly find ourselves in situations where we’re required to work with other vendors on tasks like integrating with other systems, adding/modifying code that isn’t ours, or working in an environment that we don’t have control over. These things can present potential hurdles, but we strive to do the best we can to navigate these waters because that’s what will make for the best possible experience and solution for our clients.

Much like when you’re building a relationship with a client, you’ll want to find and engage the key players of any third-party vendor and learn how best to work with them. Some of the best ways to ensure a friendly and professional relationship that meets the needs of your client and their project include:

  1. Asking early and often – If our development team needs something from a third party, whether it be access to a system or knowledge of existing code, we’ll do our best to get ahead by asking questions again and again, as soon as we know we’ll need the assistance.
  2. Understanding that third party teams have schedules, too – People often overlook the fact that other teams are fighting to meet their own deadlines outside of the project you’re working on together. We find the best way to stay on top of external deadlines is to repeatedly ask for tentative completion dates or turn-around timeframes from our co-vendors, so we can align our own goals and expectations and help better manage the goals and expectations of everyone involved in the project.
  3. Smiling – It sounds cheesy, but it can help. If you’re getting resistance from an outside party, do your best to smile when pushing for the answers you need. The best case scenario is that you establish a genuinely friendly relationship with your co-vendor but even if you don’t, getting the answers and info you need in a pleasant manner is always going to make it easier for you to work together successfully. And always remember to keep your client in the loop if you’re waiting for answers or status updates from another vendor.

Does Your Client Look at Your Development Team as a Partner?

As a developer, I often find myself in conversations about how people use applications, even outside of business hours! I frequently get the same feedback from friends/family that I do from new clients–they feel like the people who work in development (or “IT”) abandon them as quickly as possible. In developing good relationships with your client, make an effort to communicate that you’re “with them” on their project. The difference in saying something as minor as “We’ve accomplished” vs “I’ve accomplished” can have a big impact on that feeling. At Algonquin Studios, we take pride in being with our clients and doing the kind of relationship-building work discussed above gives us an extra sense of pride in what we’re able to accomplish. And, we hope that shows in all of our interactions with our clients.

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