The Corporate Dashboard

In this post, I’d like to talk about the good fundamentals of dashboard design. There’s an important item that separate a bad dashboard from a great one. It’s called a “Key Performance Indicator” or KPI. When we discuss KPIs, we are usually talking about something like “Income forecast” or “Employee productivity rates.”

The most important part of the KPI acronym is the “K” for “Key.” Key means it’s supposed to be important but all too often, I’ll hear:

“I want a dashboard with 50+ KPIs that can quickly show me the health of my company at a glance.”

Remember, the “K” stands for “Key.” Do you really need more than 50 indicators to “quickly” show the health of your company or department? Are there really 50 plus things that are “key” to your review? Can you even review 50 of anything “at a glance?” Really?

As an example, let’s take a look at a “Dashboard” with only a few KPIs versus one with lots of KPIs and see which is better suited to give us an “at a glance” view of the status of our company:

While each of these dashboards shows information that’s likely very important to the user and the health of the system, there’s an obvious difference in the amount of information being displayed and each is intended for a different kind of user.

The first is clearly a dashboard from a plane, specifically a B-58, and it has a ton of indicators and gauges. This type of dashboard can certainly be overwhelming to someone who’s not a pilot and hasn’t undertaken the significant training needed for its effective use. Now, this doesn’t mean there are too many KPIs on the dashboard, it just means that the process that the user is attempting to navigate is very complex and requires a high level of expertise. It would not be expected that someone viewing the dashboard would be able to tell the status of the plane in “at a glance.” If you really dug into it, there are probably only a few “Key” indicators on the board and lots of additional indicators that will help the pilot track specific information, look for particular problems, or do their job in emergency situations.

The second dashboard is from a BMW M series. It has two large dials for the Speedometer and the Tachometer and a few indicator lights for important factors like “Door Open” or “Check Engine.” This type of dashboard requires a much lower level of training to understand and interpret and only offers KPIs that tell the user how the car is performing in its primary objective–moving–and if there are any significant problems like a lack of gas or increased oil temperature. And it’s pretty important to realize that your car door is open when you’re driving along at 60 miles per hour! There are hundreds of other metrics that could be useful to different users (i.e. the car technician or the racing enthusiast) but they’re not “Key” performance indicators needed to simply drive the car and they can be retrieved in other ways.

Now, both of these dashboards accomplish their goal of providing all of the information that the user needs at their fingertips. But as I’m sure you could guess, the B-58 dashboard costs a lot more, because it’s more complicated in its design, its build, and its output.

If you’re considering building a dashboard, you must start by defining who your audience will be and what information they’ll need “at their fingertips” to be successful. Most dashboards only need a few metrics/gauges; the bulk of the effort should be spent on important things like that “Oil Temp” light. Define the rules to indicate that there are problems and then allow the dashboard to work for you. 

In an effort to collect some input from the readers, please comment below if your company has a dashboard. How many KPIs do you think are enough?

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2 thoughts on “The Corporate Dashboard

  1. Nick, great post!
    I totally agree design must be driven by information needs, but also think those needs to be fine tuned for action. KPIs should be selected based on what will actually drive action rather than what merely informs.

    • Great point Jason, action is a key point to think about when picking your KPIs. But, make sure that you are always thinking about the right KPIs that will provide benefit first! Then determine what the actionable points are for that KPI. This is how you handle goal lines or thresholds on a chart.

      It is far too hard to pick appropriate actions first and try to work backward toward KPIs. This method typically leads to narrowly focused Dashboards. Which aren’t always a bad thing, but can limit effectiveness.

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