My (Mostly) Unbiased Overview of Android and Apple’s iOS – Part 1

People who know me might already be assuming that this blog post will be biased, based on my preference for Android, about which I’m not usually silent. However, while working at Algonquin Studios I’ve had the opportunity to test many new mobile platforms and devices including Windows Mobile, Apple, and Android and I’ve learned some new things that I like about both iOS (Apple’s proprietary operating system), and Android (an open source, Linux-based operating system).

The battle between Apple and Android has been both futile (for the companies) and fun for people who posses an interest in the forward momentum of technology. While testing our new mobile app for SWRemote, I’ve learned both the frustration and pleasures of having the ability to work with both operating systems. Below are my top pros and cons of both systems, given in the most unbiased way I can manage:

SWRemote’s Mobile Technician was coded for, and first applied to, Apple’s iOS platform using the iPad, so that’s where I’ll start my list as there are a lot of benefits to be found testing and navigating around this robust OS.

Pro – While it’s not iOS-specific, I’d be remiss without mentioning the battery life on both the iPad and the iPad Mini. The devices have exceptional battery life both in “stand-by” mode and “screen-on” mode. Coming from a mostly Android background, I’ve become accustomed to poor battery life and have gotten used to always needing to be near a charger. This has changed a bit with newer Android models, depending on hardware, but I haven’t seen anything that comes close to the staying power of Apple’s batteries.

Pro – A second iOS pro that must not be ignored is its ease of use for beginners. iOS takes all of the complicated and aggravating things out of the operating system and goes with the philosophy of “Just Keeping it Simple.” This works out very well for both timid users who don’t like change on a large scale and beginners who are getting ready to dive into the technology arena. And, with all forms of the OS (iPhone/iPad/iTouch), Apple keeps everything the same–from the looks of the screens to the settings options–achieving great consistency across devices and lessening the learning curve for newbies.

Pro – I also have to give credit to Apple for the stability and security of its operating system, including version upgrade releases which are only held back by the personal user based on when they want to actually upgrade their system. The free upgrades always include bug fixes and other significant advancements in the OS.

But, of course, with all the good comes a bit of the bad.

Con – Thanks to the simplicity of iOS, many customization options have been curbed including any options for tweaking things like keyboard layouts, power modes, processor speeds, and memory utilization.

Con – Apple has a closed operating system which essentially means that one cannot “tap-in” to many of the areas that might be necessary for both programming and/or adapting certain hardware into software like printers, third-party drivers, etc. For developers this can be frustrating and time-consuming as we try to find workarounds for these particular applications.

Con – Apple has also limited its iOS to only Apple products. Some may see this as a benefit and say that while Apple only does one thing really well, it does that one thing really well. This might be true but when you’re limiting your customer base to only one device brand/manufacturer it can be difficult to keep up with the “Next Best Thing.” Tech consumers get bored very quickly these days and people tend to want the latest and greatest right away. Apple’s insistence that iOS only run on Apple products automatically limits its market share, regardless of the fact that it has some of the best advertising in today’s marketplace.

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This entry was posted in Android, Apple and tagged , , by Andy Bagner. Bookmark the permalink.

About Andy Bagner

I am a Software Support Manager for Algonquin Studios. I am 35 years old, and moved to Buffalo 10 years ago from Long Island. I love all things automotive, including NASCAR, and any other form of racing. I love what I do for a living, and would only trade it to become a race-car driver. Maybe someday my dream will come true :)

One thought on “My (Mostly) Unbiased Overview of Android and Apple’s iOS – Part 1

  1. Pingback: My (Mostly) Unbiased Overview of Android and Apple’s iOS – Part 2 | Algonquin Studios Blog

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