A Salute to Persistence

Persistent: tenaciously or obstinately continuing despite problems or difficulties (Encarta Dictionary).

I think persistence could be the single most underrated attribute. Persistence can often make up for deficiencies we have in our characters or skill sets. It’s one of those little things that can go unnoticed, but I bet if you were to analyze most successes under a microscope, you’d probably see persistence in abundance. And I think this would be true of people born with all kinds of natural talent and ability as well as those who have little but manage to “win” nonetheless.

Pick a hat; any hat. Pick an industry; any industry. It doesn’t matter if you want to be a successful teacher, banker, salesman, coach, parent, or spouse – you have to be persistent. If you want well-behaved kids, you can’t enforce the rules just once. You need to persistently uphold the rules and create consequences for when they aren’t obeyed. If you want a healthy marriage that stands the test of time, you and your spouse had better be prepared to work at it – persistently. What if you want to change the culture at your workplace or make some headway for the children participating in your inner-city youth soccer program? You’ve got it… you have to be persistent. Heck, remember the old standby question from high school or college “How’d he get her to go out with him?” More often than not, persistence is probably a factor in the answer.

So, let’s apply my thought process to the sales arena. Obviously, persistence is an important part of making a sale but somewhere along the line, I think persistent sales people have gotten a bad rap. Of course, if you’re persistent in an effort to sell ice to Eskimos, people will probably develop some strong, and not-so-nice, ideas about you as a sales person. But in my mind, that’s less a problem of persistence and more a lack of respect. Most of us don’t feel good about a sale that doesn’t benefit the client just as much as the vendor and, in the case of the pushy sales guy who can’t respect the fact that his prospect doesn’t need his product or service (or has simply said “no” to his sales pitch), I think persistence might be getting thrown under the bus.

As a sales consultant here at Algonquin Studios, I’m always going to be persistent. I’ll be persistent in my attempts to learn about your company; to learn what your pain points are and what you need from your web site or software; to learn what your ideal vendor relationship looks like; and to demonstrate the expertise we’ve developed and can implement for you.

And, I’ll always encourage my sales prospects to be persistent, too – persistent about vetting potential vendors for their experience, capabilities, and a general willingness to share the ins-and-outs of their companies. You should take the time to identify a clear scope of service for your projects and you should share that information with the vendors you’re considering. You should give those vendors time to ask questions about your project and allow their expertise to modify and further develop its final scope. And you should remember that if your persistence is met with reluctance or a lack of disclosure on a vendor’s part, you’ll want to take notice and be careful.

In the end, persistence will help both of us figure out if a relationship between Algonquin Studios and your company is going to be successful. So, I’d like to thank persistence for helping me and my clients get to a good place; the right place.

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