Getting the Most Out of Your Software

As we all progress further into the wonderful world of technology, more and more of our daily tasks are gravitating towards automation.  Whether it’s cars that can parallel park themselves (and much better than I could hope to, might I add) or garage doors that can be closed from another continent, technology can make our lives easier in seemingly endless ways and, to me, it seems counterintuitive for businesses, big or small, to resist the inevitable shift towards the technology-friendly way of the future.

Several of the software packages I support are geared towards helping companies in the service industry garner additional business opportunities and make existing business practices more efficient.  From my perspective as a software support representative, the companies having the most success are the ones who squeeze all the benefit they can from all of their software.

During my time working with companies in the service industry, I’ve learned that so much of what you get out of your software depends entirely on the effort you put into it and so, I present you with my personal list of things you should be doing to get the maximum bang for your buck. After all, if you’re shelling out good money for software licenses each month, don’t you want it to work as well for you as it possibly can?

  • DO take advantage of available training sessions.  SWRemote, for example, offers an open training session each week, completely free of charge. QuantumCMS offers free user groups, tutorials, and a community forum to all clients, as well. Not only does the training benefit new users, but it can also help users who have previous experience with the software by highlighting new tricks, tools, or shortcuts they may not know about.
  • DO keep an open mind when learning new software.  It’s easy to get frustrated and take an “the old way was better” approach but it’s important to judge if the old way was really the most efficient using facts, not just an emotional, “gut” response, and to understand that the benefits of a new systems can often far outweigh any learning curve that may exist.  On the other hand, staying open-minded will also help you gauge the true usefulness of the new software once you’ve become accustomed to it.
  • DO utilize your support team.  If frustrating issues arise during your use of your new software, you can be assured that the support team would like to hear about them. And don’t be afraid to ask for help if you need it. I’ve received comments along the lines of, “I feel bad bothering you with this issue” but that’s exactly what I’m here for – helping users is the sole reason my position exists!
  • DO discuss the use of the product with other users (colleagues or others in your industry).  They’re the ones putting the product to the test in real-world situations so they might be able to offer helpful advice or tips that can help your business thrive.
  • DO make feature requests or offer improvement suggestions on a regular basis.  Making a request is one of the only ways to ensure your software development team knows there’s a feature you’d like to see; for the software that I support, the vast majority of enhancement ideas come directly from our most vocal customers.  If there are changes you’d like to see, speak up!

The obvious goal of most technology is to make things easier. If a specific piece of software isn’t working for you, it’s in your best interests to figure out why but keep in mind that “easier” doesn’t always mean that you won’t have to make an effort to learn or change. Remember this and you’ll be sure to stay ahead of the curve and get more value from the things in your life that are designed to help!

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